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Archive for the ‘education’ Category

arm wresting competition

Soggydan

When most businesses think about their competition, they often identify businesses that offer similar products and services.

For example: HP thinks about Dell. American Airlines thinks about United Airlines. In essence, their competition is defined as those other businesses that compete for the same market share.

In a recent blog post, Shaun King highlighted that while this trend is true in business, it is not true for churches and nonprofits. In his post, “The MAJOR Disadvantage (& ugliness) of Non-Profits & Churches Misunderstanding Who Their Competition Is,” Shaun highlights that other nonprofits and churches are not in competition with each other.  He argues, instead, that the real competition is the factors that cause the problems.

For example:

  • If you are trying to fight hunger, the competition is poverty and access to food.
  • If you are trying to fight slavery, the competition is slave traders
  • If you are trying to fight drug crime, the competition is drug dealers

Unlike businesses, churches or nonprofits don’t compete against each other. Instead, they offer each other a partner for mission and work.

I really appreciated Shaun’s post and I would encourage other leaders to give it a read and to share it with their leaders in their organization. After all, operating a church is about changing lives, not fighting with other people who have the same goal.

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Worship Bulletin

Paulo Brabo

Over the past three weeks, I have been a visitor to three different churches, and at each, I was struck by what their worship bulletin (program) told me about the congregation and its overall ministry.

Here are some questions to consider as you review your bulletin:

  • Does your bulletin look historic or modern?– Visiting a traditional and historic church, it was no surprise that their bulletin looked out of date. It looked like the church had not updated their bulletin design since the 1980’s. In contrast one church’s bulletin had a more recent design, with colors, that conveyed a sense of life in the church.
  • Does your bulletin have pictures and colors?– similar question, but a good one to consider as we increasingly live in a world defined by visual images.
  • Is your bulletin easy to read?-This is more than just the size of your font. Hopefully the layout and flow of your bulletin is easy to read by visitors who will not be familiar with the rituals of your worship.
  • Does your bulletin welcome visitors?- Certainly a welcome note is helpful, but does it help give instructions for people who are unfamiliar with when to stand, sit, sing, take communion, pray out loud, etc?
  • Is more than half of your bulletin about the news of the church?- Some news and announcements can be good, but often (more…)

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10 Dimes

The Good Foundation

Today my wife sent me an article entitled, “Is Tithing Realistic?” It is written by Peter Dunn, aka Pete the Planner, on his blog www.petetheplanner.com.

If you don’t know Pete, you may not be aware that most of his blogs are about how to manage money. Usually they are logical, funny, and a bit crass, but rarely do they tackle religious topics.

However, in this blog, Pete tries to tackle the religious spiritual practice of tithing. Or in layman’s terms, the philanthropic practice of giving 10% of your income to God, for the support of the church, its charitable programs, and its operations.

It is an interesting article because it is written by a financial planner, who admittedly says:

  1. He is a Christian
  2. He struggles to tithe- and doesn’t quite achieve it
  3. That his post is not about scripture or the religious reasons of the practice
  4. And that he feels uncomfortable writing this blog

However, what I really loved about the blog, was that Pete didn’t stop there… He continues by admitting what makes tithing hard:

  1. God doesn’t have a bank account- God isn’t going to knock on your door to collect (more…)

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Pew Research Quiz Logo

Pew Research Quiz Logo

There is a lot of conversation in the business world about how to connect with Generation Y, aka the ‘Millennial Generation,’ as they grow and transition from youth into adulthood.

If you are not familiar with the Highlights of this group, here are a few:

  1. Currently largest generation in the USA (yes bigger than Boomers)
  2. More ethnically and racial diverse than most of USA population
  3. Less religious than most of USA population
  4. More educated than most of USA population
  5. Highly technology integrated and multi-taskers (more…)

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On Monday, I talked about how technology can bridge the accountability gap that separates donors from beneficiaries, and in the post I shared that I would write 3 blogs showing how such examples can be used. This is the last of three posts.

When I talk with pastors and nonprofit leaders I often hear the complaint, “There is just so much to do, and it is really hard to keep our website updated.”

Having been a pastor and a leader of several nonprofit organizations, I totally understand.

Question: So how can an organization create a great website that has the normal static and important information, with a website that is updated frequently?

Answer: Using RSS Feeds, Blogs, and Twitter Feeds.

One of the best examples of this combination is Keep Indianapolis Beautiful ‘s website- www.kibi.org (Be aware that the organization uses green colors to match their environmental theme). By looking on the main page, you will see a twitter column (newsfeed) on the bottom right and a blog feed in the middle of their main page (the pic below is a screenshot- click to enlarge).

 

By using these tools, you can use blogs and twitter to help communicate the many ways in which your organization impacts your community.

Blog Notes: Thanks to KIB for letting me highlight their page.

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On Monday, I talked about how technology can bridge the accountability gap that separates donors from beneficiaries, and in the post I shared that I would write 3 blogs showing how such examples can be used. This is the second of three posts.

You might have heard of Mark Horvath if you listen to NPR, watch CNN, or if you are a SXSW junkie-  He is the guy who started the the nonprofit organization, InvisiblePeople.tv, in 2008 to help tell the true story of homelessness in America.

Mark started the project when he found himself homeless, and when asked why he launched the site Mark said (excerpts taken from an interview by Kevin D. Hendricks):

Two things,

1) When I started InvisiblePeople.tv, I was close to 19 months unemployed, moving fast forward into foreclosure. I don’t think I could have filled out one more job application, and I filled out a lot. I couldn’t find work and I had to do something to keep from going crazy.

2) I knew from my own experience that the homeless story wasn’t being told correctly. We needed to empower (more…)

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Yesterday, I talked about how technology can bridge the accountability gap that separates donors from beneficiaries, and in the post I shared that I would write 3 blogs showing how such examples can be used. This is the first of three posts.

Have you ever experienced listening to a member of  a church, or nonprofit organization, who can’t clearly articulate the mission or the impact of the organization?

Maybe the experience came as a friend asked you to donate money to support a charity. Or maybe, it happened when someone invited you to church, or as a friend described why they volunteers their time.

In many cases, these experiences are awkward attempts to tell the story of an organization. However, because most of these stories are told by volunteers or members, they often miss the true power of sharing the core mission and impact of an organization.

Given this experience, many organizations are now turning to technology to help them to:

  1. Tell the Story- Using their own words and images (pictures, blogs, videos, etc) (more…)

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