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Archive for the ‘planning’ Category

Earlier this week Guidestar posted the results of a survey that asked nonprofits about their fundraising and operations for 2011.  Here are some of the highlights:

  • 41% of Charities saw an Increase in Giving for the first 9 months of 2011 over 2010 (28% had less income & 31% no change)
  • 65% of nonprofits saw an increased need for their services– over the past 9 months compared to 2010
  • Approximately 50% of charities have some financial stress – income, cash flow, # of donors, non-donor income

For more information, visit Guidestar’s website

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On Monday I was interviewed by Alex Johnson, a reporter for MSNBC.com about how churches are using social media.

In the interview I really tried to stress that churches really have a great opportunity to connect with their local communities (via social media), and that the conversation was taking place, with or without their official presence.  Here is the link to the full article: “For Some Churches, The Internet Clicks; for Others It Doesn’t”

social media

some_communication

Much of article focuses on how different denominations and local churches have adapted to using social media.  But, the article also helps to spell out that congregations need to think through how they plan to use it.  It is not enough just to create a facebook page or to have a static website.  Instead, churches really need to think about their ‘brand’ and what messages they hope to convey to their potential audience.

As you read the article, here are some helpful questions to ask about your church’s use of Social Media:

  1. Who are we trying to target?
  2. What is our overall goal for using Social Media
  3. What messages should we try to communicate?
  4. How can we participate in the conversation, rather than just push out information? (more…)

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Worship Bulletin

Paulo Brabo

Over the past three weeks, I have been a visitor to three different churches, and at each, I was struck by what their worship bulletin (program) told me about the congregation and its overall ministry.

Here are some questions to consider as you review your bulletin:

  • Does your bulletin look historic or modern?– Visiting a traditional and historic church, it was no surprise that their bulletin looked out of date. It looked like the church had not updated their bulletin design since the 1980’s. In contrast one church’s bulletin had a more recent design, with colors, that conveyed a sense of life in the church.
  • Does your bulletin have pictures and colors?– similar question, but a good one to consider as we increasingly live in a world defined by visual images.
  • Is your bulletin easy to read?-This is more than just the size of your font. Hopefully the layout and flow of your bulletin is easy to read by visitors who will not be familiar with the rituals of your worship.
  • Does your bulletin welcome visitors?- Certainly a welcome note is helpful, but does it help give instructions for people who are unfamiliar with when to stand, sit, sing, take communion, pray out loud, etc?
  • Is more than half of your bulletin about the news of the church?- Some news and announcements can be good, but often (more…)

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Last week I was contacted by Bart Voight of Voight Creations about setting up a referral process for churches who might need visual renderings or 3D modeling for their various building or capital fundraising campaigns.

In many cases, architects can provide a simple floor plan or elevation sketches to help donors envision what the final project will look like. However, in some cases a church may wish to consider having a more detailed or realistic model, which can now be created with 3D technology (see image).

church rendering

Voigt Creations

In my conversation with Bart, I asked him, “What are the top 5 reasons a church may wish to use this technology?” His responses are below.

What are the top 5 reasons a rendering would be helpful to a church?

  1. Clarification of concepts and ideas-  the vision of the project
  2. Zoning or code approval- assisting local zoning boards (more…)

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Pew Research Quiz Logo

Pew Research Quiz Logo

There is a lot of conversation in the business world about how to connect with Generation Y, aka the ‘Millennial Generation,’ as they grow and transition from youth into adulthood.

If you are not familiar with the Highlights of this group, here are a few:

  1. Currently largest generation in the USA (yes bigger than Boomers)
  2. More ethnically and racial diverse than most of USA population
  3. Less religious than most of USA population
  4. More educated than most of USA population
  5. Highly technology integrated and multi-taskers (more…)

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People meeting together

nateOne

The top ten list below came from the Boardsource’s website, which is a great resource for any and all nonprofit organizations.

Ten Basic Responsibilities of Nonprofit Boards

  1. Determine mission and purpose. It is the board’s responsibility to create and review a statement of mission and purpose that articulates the organization’s goals, means, and primary constituents served.
  2. Select the chief executive. Boards must reach consensus on the chief executive’s responsibilities and undertake a careful search to find the most qualified individual for the position.
  3. Support and evaluate the chief executive. The board should ensure that the chief executive has the moral and professional support he or she needs to further the goals of the organization.
  4. Ensure effective planning. Boards must actively participate in an overall planning process and assist in implementing and monitoring the plan’s goals. (more…)

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Social Media Magazine

some_communication

With so many people interacting online through social media (Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, etc) more and more companies and nonprofits have begun to develop their own social media presence and brand.

Usually the entrance into social media happens through the interaction of members of the organization, and then maybe someone creates an ‘official fan page.’  But quickly (and informally), many churches and nonprofits have found themselves expanding and creating online content, without creating a full vision of how they wish to use and maintain their social media presence.

This topic has been on my mind this week after I was asked by a pastor, “Do you have or know of a good social media policy for churches?”

I had to respond by saying, “No, but if you give me a day or so, I can pull some notes from the social media policy at our office, and share them.”  So here goes… I have cut an paste a few suggestions that are good rules of thumbs if your congregation wishes to have a social media policy for its staff, operations, board, and members.

Social Media Policy

Intro:

XXX (insert your church or nonprofit’s name here) encourages employees, directors and other partners to adopt social media as a means to engage others in our ministry in missional ways. Whether you’re on Facebook, Twitter, writing a blog, uploading (more…)

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