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Archive for the ‘Thank You’ Category

In its second edition of the World Giving Index, the Charities Aid Foundation has determined that the United States is the most charitable country in the world.

The study found that out of the 153 countries evaluated, the people in the United States were the most generous with their donation and volunteering for charities and other nonprofit organizations.

The study also showed that giving globally has increased by 2% and that volunteering has increased by 1%.

The report also has a great picture showing how giving has been distributed (originally found at http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2011/12/world-giving-index-2011.html ) shown below:

Map of Giving

Charities Aid Foundation

 

For more information read the report at https://www.cafonline.org/publications/2011-publications/world-giving-index-2011.aspx

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Bell Ringers

Akron Kiwanis

During the ‘Season of Giving,’ most of us are aware that churches and nonprofit organization rely upon the generosity of others for their operations.

Lest we forget, we often receive several letters, emails, phone calls, and of course we will see the Salvation Army bell ringers. However, while most of us are on the receiving end of soliciation… very few of us are aware of the great amount of detail and effort that larger nonprofit organizations use to research and track our giving habits.

Just like retailers and credit companies, many larger nonprofit organizations rely upon market research and public information to learn about our philanthropic passions and wealth. In a recenet NYT article, “Taking Fundraising to the Next Level, author Rob Lieber highlights just how a larger nonprofit organization like a hospital, college, or major foundation will likely track your information.

For most small nonprofit leaders, and most donors, this article will likely be the first time that you see how professional fundraising is done, and like the author, I would say that I support their efforts- even if it seems a little unsettling.

As I read this article, I thought it would also be a great way to help leaders of smaller nonprofit organizations see the bigger picture and learn how some of the biggest and best fundraisers in America support their causes and philanthropy organizations.

Enjoy the reading and have a Merry Christmas.

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Earlier this week Guidestar posted the results of a survey that asked nonprofits about their fundraising and operations for 2011.  Here are some of the highlights:

  • 41% of Charities saw an Increase in Giving for the first 9 months of 2011 over 2010 (28% had less income & 31% no change)
  • 65% of nonprofits saw an increased need for their services– over the past 9 months compared to 2010
  • Approximately 50% of charities have some financial stress – income, cash flow, # of donors, non-donor income

For more information, visit Guidestar’s website

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If you have read the book Freakonomics, or listened to Marketplace on NPR, then you probably are familiar with Stephen J. Dubner’s use of statistics to explain common behaviors in economics and society.

As a stats junkie myself, I love their work, and on Tuesday’s Marketplace radio program- Dubner reported on some truths and myths about fundraising (to listen to the program, click the NPR link above). Dubner’s report included an interview with John List, who is a professor at the Univ of Chicago. Professor List studies the economics of charities

So here is a taste from the interview:

  • Seed Money helps– The more seed money that you have induces more people to give, and those people tend to give more money.
  • Matching Gifts– only work up to a 1-1 match.  People will not usually give more than the original match amount (this is contrary to most expert advice)
  • Raffles are a Big Deal– Research shows that by offering someone a prize will increase their gift by almost 100%
  • One & Done- This is new, but it gives control to the donor. Donors who are offered the “give us one gift and you can tell use never to contact you again” option, tend to give more money and more often. Few actually choose to not be contacted again.
  • Guilt Pleas Don’t Work– You may get a 1 time gift from guilt or shame tactics, but in the long run you are only burning bridges.

As you think about how to raise money for your organization and its operations, I would encourage you to consider this information. Take a moment to think about how you raise money for your annual fundraising, and take a second to listen to the full interview.

Blog Notes- the above bullets are paraphrases from the interview found in the Freakonomics & Marketplace Report for Nov. 29, 2011.

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Worship Bulletin

Paulo Brabo

Over the past three weeks, I have been a visitor to three different churches, and at each, I was struck by what their worship bulletin (program) told me about the congregation and its overall ministry.

Here are some questions to consider as you review your bulletin:

  • Does your bulletin look historic or modern?– Visiting a traditional and historic church, it was no surprise that their bulletin looked out of date. It looked like the church had not updated their bulletin design since the 1980’s. In contrast one church’s bulletin had a more recent design, with colors, that conveyed a sense of life in the church.
  • Does your bulletin have pictures and colors?– similar question, but a good one to consider as we increasingly live in a world defined by visual images.
  • Is your bulletin easy to read?-This is more than just the size of your font. Hopefully the layout and flow of your bulletin is easy to read by visitors who will not be familiar with the rituals of your worship.
  • Does your bulletin welcome visitors?- Certainly a welcome note is helpful, but does it help give instructions for people who are unfamiliar with when to stand, sit, sing, take communion, pray out loud, etc?
  • Is more than half of your bulletin about the news of the church?- Some news and announcements can be good, but often (more…)

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Graph showing giving in December

Network for Good

Most churches know that December is a big month for income, and overall online giving for nonprofits mirrors this trend.

In a recent report by Network for Good, research found that 33% of all online giving happens in the month of December.  This is an important statistic to help organizations plan for their operating cash flow, but it also highlights the need to keep websites active and easy to navigate.

Further research shows that many people will make a final blitz of giving on Dec. 31,  in order to beat the tax deadline, a date when many nonprofits are closed.

If you have or are considering online giving, I hope this information will encourage you to review your online giving plans before Dec. 1.

Blog Notes: Special thanks to Network for Good for sharing this information.

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10 Dimes

The Good Foundation

Today my wife sent me an article entitled, “Is Tithing Realistic?” It is written by Peter Dunn, aka Pete the Planner, on his blog www.petetheplanner.com.

If you don’t know Pete, you may not be aware that most of his blogs are about how to manage money. Usually they are logical, funny, and a bit crass, but rarely do they tackle religious topics.

However, in this blog, Pete tries to tackle the religious spiritual practice of tithing. Or in layman’s terms, the philanthropic practice of giving 10% of your income to God, for the support of the church, its charitable programs, and its operations.

It is an interesting article because it is written by a financial planner, who admittedly says:

  1. He is a Christian
  2. He struggles to tithe- and doesn’t quite achieve it
  3. That his post is not about scripture or the religious reasons of the practice
  4. And that he feels uncomfortable writing this blog

However, what I really loved about the blog, was that Pete didn’t stop there… He continues by admitting what makes tithing hard:

  1. God doesn’t have a bank account- God isn’t going to knock on your door to collect (more…)

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