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In its second edition of the World Giving Index, the Charities Aid Foundation has determined that the United States is the most charitable country in the world.

The study found that out of the 153 countries evaluated, the people in the United States were the most generous with their donation and volunteering for charities and other nonprofit organizations.

The study also showed that giving globally has increased by 2% and that volunteering has increased by 1%.

The report also has a great picture showing how giving has been distributed (originally found at http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2011/12/world-giving-index-2011.html ) shown below:

Map of Giving

Charities Aid Foundation

 

For more information read the report at https://www.cafonline.org/publications/2011-publications/world-giving-index-2011.aspx

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Earlier this week Guidestar posted the results of a survey that asked nonprofits about their fundraising and operations for 2011.  Here are some of the highlights:

  • 41% of Charities saw an Increase in Giving for the first 9 months of 2011 over 2010 (28% had less income & 31% no change)
  • 65% of nonprofits saw an increased need for their services– over the past 9 months compared to 2010
  • Approximately 50% of charities have some financial stress – income, cash flow, # of donors, non-donor income

For more information, visit Guidestar’s website

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Programmable Wifi Thermostats

The Nest

When most of us think about a HV/AC system, we usually picture an older furnace- rarely would we picture a sleek thermostat that connects to a wifI system. However, this seems to be the future of energy controls for commercial and residential buildings.

Since 2008, manufacturers have offered thermostats that can connect to a wifi system, thus allowing control and access to the system via the internet. This has been a great upgrade, but until now many of the programmable thermostats have been confusing to use. In fact, the US Dept of Energy realized that most people who purchased programmable thermostats, actually used more energy than before, because they were too complicated to use.

So in an effort to make programmable thermostats more user friendly, several companies have begun to create systems that can be controlled by a computer using a program like Microsoft Outlook set set room temperatures.  Other companies, have also begun to make intuitive thermostats that create a pattern of use based on how you adjust the temperature over a period of a few weeks.

With heating and cooling systems accounting for 16% of the electricity in the USA, and more than half of the energy consumed in a house, HV/AC systems will continue to be a focus for utility companies as they try to reduce the amount of energy consumed in the United States. This trend will likely also become a focus of more and more churches, facility managers, and home owners as the cost of energy continues to rise.

After all, the less money that people and organizations are forced to pay for utilities, operations, and energy, the more money they have to support the mission and programs that they value. For more information about changing HV/AC systems, please read the following articles:

Blog notes: Several of the stats given in this blog were pulled from these  two articles. The picture above comes from several sources and is provided by the company and can be found on their website- http://www.nest.com

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group of people

laubarnes

If you follow trends in fundraising (most people don’t), then you may remember that America saw a shift in how organizations approach small donors during the 2008 election campaign.

Prior to 2008, most organizations had mainly focused on reaching major donors- and many still do. However, in 2008, there was a major shift in how organizations began to reach out to donors who made many small and medium sized gifts.  The two reasons being:

  1. Most potential major donors have already been targeted
  2. Technology has allowed better access and communication via email, internet, and mobile communciation

Together these two shifts have allowed more and more organizations to expand their base, and thus, improve the stability and size of their fundraising work. But when we look at this trend, however, we see that it has largely been adopted by larger nonprofit organizations, and not small nonprofits or churches.

So beyond the shift, what is the big deal as it relates to fundraising for churches?

Well the main reason is that churches have often been the envy of other nonprofit organizations, for the following reasons:

  • Churches usually have a loyal base that donates weekly, monthly, etc
  • Churches make a regular ask each week, most nonprofits only get 3-5 a year
  • Religious people tend donate 3 times more than non-religious people
  • Religion accounts for the largest segment of fundraising each year
  • People who attend church are usually versed in donating habits and believe in serving other

So with the shift of other nonprofits into expanding their base of small and middle donors… churches, and other small nonprofits, will now be competing more and more for the same donors and money. This competition will not really matter for donors who are over the age of 60 and who physically give in the offering plate each week. But it will matter for donors under the age of 60, who now want more and more access to online giving and better transparency of how their gifts are used.

Thus, if you are a church leader, I would strongly encourage you to work with your financial leadership team to start reviewing how members and participates are currently donating to your church, and how you can make donating more accessible via electronic transfers and online giving. By being aware of people’s financial habits, churches can better offer ways for members to support the mission, ministry, and operations of the church.

For more information about this trend, check out a recent article in the WSJ entitled, “Strength in Numbers

 

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Picture of Twitter Bird

some_communication

Last week I was interviewed by MSNBC for an article about how churches are using social media (read it here). As I prepped for the article, I created a list of reasons why churches should consider using Social Media (SM).

5 Reasons to Consider Using Social Media for Your Church:

  1. Local Context– Unlike most communication mediums, SM is grassroots based- meaning it provides a powerful way to reach out to people in your specific community.
  2. Be Present in the Conversation about You– People discuss all kinds of issues on SM- including their church. In order to be part of conversation, you need to be present. This is especially key when communicating about brand, major events, or in times of a crisis.
  3. Reach Gen X and Millenials– Younger generations are skeptical about institutional church- SM offers a way to engage with them, whereas they would be hesitant walk into a church building.
  4. Connect with People not Present– SM offers tools to connect with people who are unable to be physically present- traveling, hospital, shut-ins, etc. With SM they can participate live or by watching/engaging with an event later.
  5. Facilitate Conversation– more than just telling people about your church and its ministry, SM provides a place for a larger conversation where everyone has a voice- providing more transparency and accountability for organizations.

If you want to consider how Social Media can improve the operations and ministry of your church, I would also encourage you to follow Rev. Courtney Richards on facebook or twitter (@c_rev) – links are for her pages.

Courtney is a minister at Geist Christian Church in Indianapolis (facebook link), and when I asked her about SM, she said, “I use SM all the time to keep us with members and with what is going on in the community. It has been great way to reach out to people and to offer either a word of support or to give someone a shout out for their hard work.”

If you are considering using Social Media, feel free to read a number of blogs that I have posted here, and to also find someone in your local community who can assist you. You can begin by just listening and observing first, and then jump in as you feel ready.

Blog Notes: Special thanks to Courtney Richards for the quote and letting me share her online twitter profile.

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On Monday I was interviewed by Alex Johnson, a reporter for MSNBC.com about how churches are using social media.

In the interview I really tried to stress that churches really have a great opportunity to connect with their local communities (via social media), and that the conversation was taking place, with or without their official presence.  Here is the link to the full article: “For Some Churches, The Internet Clicks; for Others It Doesn’t”

social media

some_communication

Much of article focuses on how different denominations and local churches have adapted to using social media.  But, the article also helps to spell out that congregations need to think through how they plan to use it.  It is not enough just to create a facebook page or to have a static website.  Instead, churches really need to think about their ‘brand’ and what messages they hope to convey to their potential audience.

As you read the article, here are some helpful questions to ask about your church’s use of Social Media:

  1. Who are we trying to target?
  2. What is our overall goal for using Social Media
  3. What messages should we try to communicate?
  4. How can we participate in the conversation, rather than just push out information? (more…)

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mobile wallet

Feuillu

The holiday season is upon us, and I have begun to plan out my end of year donations. So far it has been fairly easy to make donations online, but in a few cases I have become frustrated by the multiple steps/screens to set up an account.

If you have ever tried to make an online donation, then likely you share my pain.

  • First, you log on to a website of your favorite charity.
  • Then you click the “Donate Now” button.
  • Next you are taken to an second screen and asked to fill out an online form with your name, address, and contact information.
  • Then are asked to enter your bank account or credit card info.
  • And finally you are asked to enter your amount and to click submit.

Now if you were not counting… that is approximately 5 steps.

Not bad, but what if it only took 1 step… sort of like swiping your credit card, writing a check, or dropping cash into an offering plate?

If banks and retail stores have figured out away to make shopping convenient, why can’t charities and banks find a way to make online giving easier?

Enter the mobile wallet.

Originally designed to assist customers to shop at online merchants, (more…)

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